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History of the Association
Aikido in Kent Association became an independent Association in May 2016 providing its members with its own Insurance through Endsleigh Insurance and Hiscox.

The  Association was formed in November 2010 and follows the teachings of Sensei Tomiki. Sensei Tomiki being one of the first students of O-Sensei Ueshiba, was also in his own right, a high ranking Judoka and very competitively motivated. The first Sensei to bring Tomiki Aikido into Great Britain was Santa Yamada. His teachings were more of an enjoyment form than competition.

Style
The style of Aikido practised by the Aikido in Kent Association was developed by Sensei Tomiki. He integrated the competitive aspects of Judo with Aikido thus enabling students at the Waseda University to practice `Contest Aikido`. Following Santa Yamada`s return to Japan, Sensei Naito arrived and taught the new contest format Randori No Kata (hand to hand Randori). Later, Tanto Randori (knife Randori) was introduced and is still practised today.
These teachings are cantered on techniques grouped together into series of kata, some of which seek to preserve the ancient use of Tanto, Jo and Bokken, together with open Randori, which encourages freedom of movement appropriate to differing attacks, students are encouraged to test their proficiency in competitions.

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